Tuesday, June 13, 2017

A Brief History of Hamilton, Ohio




We opened Pet Wants Hamilton because we want to make it easy for you to understand what is in your pets’ food and to ensure you have access to a better option. Our wonderful pet food is slow-cooked in small batches with fresh, all-natural ingredients every 30 days. Owning this business fulfills our desire to help make our community an even better place, as well as support local initiatives, our first responders and our parks.

As active community outreach volunteers, we are committed helping local rescues and humane societies by offering our high-quality pet food to the animals in their care. We intend to continue these compassionate efforts by helping vulnerable children, women and families. Because being part of the Hamilton community is something that’s very special to us, we want to take a look at the history that has turned the city into the great place it is today:

A Look Back at Hamilton’s Roots

The history of Hamilton can be traced all the way back to 1791. Originally named Fort Hamilton as a way to honor Alexander Hamilton, the area served as a supply station for the troops of generals Arthur St. Clair, followed by Anthony Wayne. A couple of decades later, Hamilton was first incorporated by act of the Ohio General Assembly in 1810. However, elections weren’t held in 1815, which caused Hamilton to lose its status. After reincorporating in 1827 with Rossville, the two location severed ties in 1831 and then rejoined in 1854. In September of 1859, Abraham Lincoln arrived at the Hamilton Station and gave a speech that concentrated on popular sovereignty.

In 1867, Hamilton withdrew from the townships of Fairfield and St. Clair to form a "paper township.” Around this time, Hamilton developed as a significant manufacturing city. Steam engines, reapers and threshers are all examples of the types of equipment manufactured here. By the early 20th century, the town was a heavy-manufacturing center for vaults, machine tools, cans for vegetables, paper, paper making machinery and locomotives. March of 1913 brought a massive flood to Hamilton. Flood waters rose with unexpected and frightening suddenness, reaching over three to eight feet in depth in downtown, and up to eighteen feet in the North End, along Fifth Street and through South Hamilton Crossing.

Hamilton Today


The latest census, which was conducted in 2010, found 62,477 people, 24,658 households, and 15,489 families residing in Hamilton. 2010 also marked the most recent time the city hosted the Little League World Series. Hamilton Little League has won ten of the last twelve state championships. With a significant capital program for the Hamilton City School district, an incredible public library and much more, the future looks quite bright for our city, and we look forward to being part of it for years to come!

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